Best Lemon Poppyseed Muffins

In the same vein as a second semester home-ec class in 1977, here is a genuine muffin. Not cake batter in the shape of a muffin, but a not-too-sweet muffin with the coarser crumb that defines old school homemade muffins.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees-this is always the first step.

List of ingredients-get them gathered with the proper cooking utensils second.

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 cup granulated sugar

2 1/2 TBS powdered buttermilk

2 TBS Poppy seeds

2 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 cup oil

1/2 cup milk

2 eggs

1 lemon

1/4 cup powdered sugar plus more for glaze

Ingredients for Lemon Poppyseed muffins
2 cups all-purpose flour
About 1 cup granulated sugar (adjust to how sweet you want the muffins to be)
2-1/2 Tablespoons powdered buttermilk.
2 teaspoons baking powder.
1/2 teaspoon baking soda (to activate the buttermilk).
2 Tablespoons poppy seeds.
Mix dry ingredients.
1/2 cup oil in a 2 cup measuring cup (this is canola oil).
1/2 cup milk (this is non-fat).
Add 2 eggs to wet ingredients.
Microplane the entire lemon zest into the dry or wet ingredients (this time into the dry, with a quick stir).
Cut lemon in half. Juice.
Remove seeds from the juice. Reserve the juices lemon halves. Add juice to wet ingredients.
Mix wet ingredients well.
Pour wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Gently fold and stir just until all dry ingredients are incorporated.
Spray muffin pan with oil. Make sure your oven is preheated to 400 degrees.
Fill muffin cups 3/4 full.
Set timer to 20 minutes.
Stir up the lemon glaze, start with 1/4 cup powdered sugar.
Squeeze juice out of the reserved lemon halves.
Add a little milk. The glazers is adjusted by adding a little powdered sugar and a little milk or fresh lemon juice and lemon pulp and lemon zest left on the microplane until it looks right.
Stir glaze.
Stir glaze.
Add the lemon zest!
Remove from the oven. They should be deep golden brown and spring back when touched. Don’t burn your fingers!
Put just a little glaze on top!
According to my home economics teacher, never use a knife on muffins. Just pull open gently and place a pat of butter inside.

Example of Online Bullying?

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Is this an example of bullying?

Let’s use this to open a dialogue about online communication. I’m not worried about hurting this man’s reputation, since he has long been employed at the same small business, perhaps it is his own business, and he only has 8 connections on LinkedIn. So this is a great opportunity to discuss choices. My first point: I feel bad for my friend, Meegan Kiefel, who opened up this topic of conversation, only to have such an off-topic and mean-spirited comment to surface from one of her followers. Meegan is a wonderful person, kind, warm-hearted, and open. She would never encourage this type of comment, in fact none of my beautiful friends would support this. It is not his post or conversation to barge in on. Not his business. Yes, it’s publicly online, but that doesn’t nullify good manners, nor common sense.

Second Point: This dialogue should go deeper. It doesn’t matter to me what was posted by a stranger, but if I were less mature, younger, without exposure to the harshness of others, this could have silenced me, or worse, hurt my self-confidence. In fact, I considered completely ignoring this silly comment. However, I realize in our current culture, I cannot walk away. It would be missing the opportunity given to me to share some important topics of consideration. Such as the following questions: What are we accepting in our society, in our communication, in our media as acceptable communication? Are we afraid of reading/hearing different perspectives and points-of-view? Can we be more invitational? Can we ask more questions and listen to more answers? I say “no” to our media’s presentation of mockery, insinuation, deliberate misguided interpretation, insults, and pointless coverage. We can empower each other to rise above the lowest common denominator.

Point Three: There are many good reasons to practice courtesy, case in point, your own personal branding. What does this comment say about this person? How many potential customers and employers will see this comment? What we say is a reflection of our character. Let us be more than mockers, belittlers, bullies, and haters. Choose to uplift, encourage, and inform. Don’t be silenced, but rather sound the call for kindness. After all, we can reflect the light within, even on Facebook.